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Back from oblivion

Posted by on 2:47 am in Featured | 5 comments

Back from oblivion

Monday, October 17th, 2016, should be remembered as the day that the comfortable, the well-fed, forty-eight inch waistbands who run Iraq decided to do something about the Islamic State’s two year long deathgrip on that country. The battle for Mosul has begun. Two years ago I was in Iraq around September/August of 2014, and watched as thousands of people poured out of the West escaping the ISIS invasion – a driving, walking and stumbling wave of humanity desperate to flee the latest Islamic hell on earth. Most of the displaced were...

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Stretch out your hand

Posted by on 4:31 pm in Blog, Christians in the Media, Featured, Middle East, Some good news | 4 comments

Stretch out your hand

Again he entered the synagogue. There was a man there who had a withered hand.They watched him closely to see if he would cure him on the sabbath so that they might accuse him. He said to the man with the withered hand, “Come up here before us.” Then he said to them, “Is it lawful to do good on the sabbath rather than to do evil, to save life rather than to destroy it?” But they remained silent. Looking around at them with anger and grieved at their hardness of heart, he said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out and his...

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Just one look

Posted by on 3:48 pm in Featured, Middle East, Photgraphic Impact | 1 comment

Just one look

I can remember the first time that I walked into the Musée d’Orsay in Paris and saw this portrait of Vincent van Gough. (Left: Vincent van Gough, self-portrait, 1889. Copyright, Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France) He painted it in 1889, and it is believed to be his last self-portrait before his suicide in 1890. Having visited his grave as well as the wheatfield where he shot himself, those piercing blue eye had a profound effect on me. I do not know if you’ve experienced this feeling before, the sense that someone (or even something)...

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“Never put a scorpion in your pocket.”

Posted by on 3:41 pm in Blog, Featured, Global Jihad, Iraqi Men, Terror's Handiwork | 2 comments

“Never put a scorpion in your pocket.”

Back in 2014 I was in Amman, Jordan. While there I met an extraordinary man, a retired Assyrian boxer named Azor. Azor told me that he had once boxed on the Iraqi national team and, despite his advancing age, still loved the sport. To make this point he produced two sets of boxing gloves and insisted that I go a couple of mock rounds with him in the livingroom of the small apartment where he and his family stayed. Fortunately, he never allowed himself to lay a glove on me. (Above: Azor the boxer (pictured L.) goes easy on me. Amman, Jordan....

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The pro’s and con’s of “seeing is believing”

Posted by on 7:32 pm in Blog, Featured, Media | 3 comments

The pro’s and con’s of “seeing is believing”

According to the collective knowledge of Wikipedia, the idiom “seeing is believing” was first recorded in 1639, which means it had likely been in use for some time prior to that date. The simple explanation of this expression is that things you can see are “truer” or more “real” than those you cannot. But when it comes to photographs we should be very, very careful about what, or even more importantly why, we see something as true or real. (Above: Jeff Gardner – Selfie. Copyright © Jeff Gardner, 2016) “I discourage the use of the...

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To be heroic

Posted by on 4:21 pm in Featured | 0 comments

To be heroic

This past week I have been reading a lot of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, the French pilot and writer perhaps best known for his work, The Little Prince. At the risk of sounding like a language snob, Exupéry is one of those authors that you must read in his native language (French) if you hope to understand the depth of what he is getting at in his work. It’s simply true that there is never an absolute, word for word, transliteration of meaning from one language to another, and something is always, as the saying goes, lost in translation. That...

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How to measure a journey

Posted by on 4:06 pm in Featured | 0 comments

How to measure a journey

This week I was clearing out some folders on one of my production computers, which, given the number of photographs that I take during an assignment, I should do much more often. As I sorted through the images, some of them from years ago, I was struck by the many miles that I have traveled in the past five years. What, I wondered, I am to make of all of this travel? Growing up I was a restless soul (yeah, big surprise). As a family we were poor (very poor in fact), and getting around the mountainous Salt Lake City valley where I grew up...

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The Greater Danger

Posted by on 5:58 pm in Blog, Featured, Middle East, Photgraphic Impact, Terror's Handiwork | 0 comments

The Greater Danger

[Best_Wordpress_Gallery id=”11″ gal_title=”The Greater Danger_Blog_Post”]   August 7th marked the two year anniversary of the invasion of Qaraqosh, Iraq, by the Islamic State. Qaraqosh (sometimes called Bakhdida) is an ancient Assyrian city located just southeast of Mosul and was, in 2014, completely overrun by Islamic State fighters. I was in Iraq at the end of August, 2014, not far from Qaraqosh. Watching the flood of people escaping and fleeing to cities like Erbil and Dohuk was an experience that I find...

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Our Bad Case of Phobophobia

Posted by on 3:33 pm in Featured, Global Jihad, Terror's Handiwork | 0 comments

Our Bad Case of Phobophobia

Recently, I was on the Drew Mariani Show with guest host Ed Morrissey of HotAir.com. As we were discussing the ongoing efforts (such as they are) to deal with the Islamic State, we touched on the Islamic State’s English language magazine, Dabiq. For those unfamiliar with this nasty little rag, let me encourage you to get to know it and, like the Quran, read it carefully. I will tell you upfront that Dabiq is tightly focused publication with a highly polished production value. It is also flat out grotesque, with many images not suitable for...

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Remembering Father Jacques Hamel

Posted by on 7:31 pm in Blog, Featured, Terror's Handiwork | 2 comments

Remembering Father Jacques Hamel

Today, Tuesday July 26, 2016, Father Jacques Hamel was celebrating Mass in the small town of Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray, near Rouen. As he began the morning Mass, two Islamic State militants stormed the church and, taking Father and four other people hostage, cut his throat (likely trying to behead him) in front of the altar. He was 84 years old. Aside from its pure barbarism, the thing about this sad morning that should shock us most is how few will acknowledge that militant Islam and Islamists are making war on Christians and Christianity....

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